Terrible lawyer suspended by SC State Supreme Court

J. Marshall Biddle photo found online.

J. Marshall Biddle photo found online.

J. Marshall Biddle looking jolly in a photo found at myhorrynews.com

J. Marshall Biddle looking jolly in a photo found at myhorrynews.com

Trusting an important legal matter to a family name that has owned land in the area for over 150 years was apparently not such a good idea. One would think this lawyer never expected to actually have to work for a living after he finished law school. It is so sad for his clients who probably paid a pretty penny for that bow tie.

Myrtle Beach-area attorney suspended from practice
www.myrtlebeachonline.com  | June 24, 2015  | 

A Myrtle Beach-area attorney has been suspended from practicing law for three years as part of an agreement about misconduct since 2008 involving several lawsuits, probate court matters and post-conviction relief actions, according to a state Supreme Court opinion filed Wednesday.

Justices ordered James Marshall Biddle to be suspended for three years, pay the costs incurred in the investigation and prosecution of the matter within 30 days and complete an ethics program before he can file for reinstatement, according to the order.

If Biddle seeks to be reinstated as a lawyer, he must hire a law office management adviser approved by the Commission on Lawyer Conduct and complete filings with that adviser, according to the order. Biddle also must meet with the adviser once every three months for two years and a report must be filed after those meetings.

Biddle could not be immediately reached Wednesday for comment.

In the 11-page opinion, justices addressed eight separate issues involving Biddle and his practice that occurred in 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2012.

The issues included:

Biddle failing to provide competent representation to his clients;

keeping his clients informed of statuses and requests for information;

providing rate fee and expenses to clients;

expediting litigation consistent with the client’s interest;

not making false statements or concealing material;

and failing to respond for information from disciplinary authority.


Continue reading »

House Blown to Smithereens

Wow, so that’s what smithereens look like. An aging infrastructure and increase in sink holes could make gas explosions like this huge one in Stafford Township, NJ more common.

Biscuit Recipe

Eatmore of www.eatmoretoadstools.com gave me this biscuit recipe earlier this holiday season. Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Ahhh biscuits. Reasonably healthy, but still tasty: get a package of
Trader Joe’s Multigrain Baking & Pancake mix & follow the biscuit recipe,
but I like to substitute soured raw milk or real buttermilk, because I
like the tang. And if it’s got enough fat, which mine does when I pour off
the top, no need for oil. For real Southern light empty calorie biscuits,
I mix White Lily flour, the soured milk or buttermilk, baking powder,
salt, and maybe a little baking soda. In each case, knead lightly, and cut
the biscuits with a Mason jar lid or the jar itself. I don’t really
measure, so I don’t know how much of each ingredient. If you knead too
much, you get my ex-wife’s hardtack. You always have dough left over when
you cut with the lid, and that gives you one more biscuit that isn’t as
light. One for the cook when it comes out of the oven. Can’t remember the
oven temps, but use whatever any common recipe has, and bake until done.

For soured milk I use canned evaporated skim milk and add a tablespoon or two of cider vinegar. I use a hot 400-450 oven and keep my biscuits T-N-T, tight but not touching.


Reading, Pennsylvania keeping ugly tree


Not the tree’s best angle.


The pretzel as a tree topper is an adorable nod the the long heritage of Reading.

Like many rust belt towns Reading, Pennsylvania has seen better days. Reading (sounds like red-ding) sits in the middle of Christmas Tree farm country. They had initially arranged to purchase a tree from a farmer in Schuylkill County. It rained heavily right before the tree was to be cut and delivered and the farmer wouldn’t allow the big truck needed to drive across his fields so they hastily came up with a plan B and went to a local park and cut the homely tree they have on display. After world wide weird news exposure they decided to keep the sparse spruce. Partly because City Council was too busy with real issues like budget deadlines to deal with a uh, holiday tree. Somehow it is fitting that the bedraggled downtown that has seen better days has come to terms with their tree. Here’s wishing Reading and all of you a happy, humble, and healthy start to your own holiday season. Big ups to the Reading City Council for having their priorities in order, too.

All images except for night view credit the Reading Eagle, Natalie Kolb | Tim Leedy

34_2 7   141124_ugly_tree

It’s a holly, folly Christmas: Reading reverses decision, says tree stays

Reading Eagle  |  November 24, 2014

Apparently unable to decide what they want for Christmas, city officials, who had agreed to remove the 50-foot holiday spruce from Penn Square, changed their minds on Monday.The droopy pine can stay in downtown as Reading’s official Christmas tree.

City Council President Francis G. Acosta didn’t reverse course until after the city endured a good needling over the “Charlie Brown tree” that has gained international attention.The decision to keep the tree came about 1 p.m. Monday after city workers spent the morning removing lights from the big tree and decorative fencing around it.

“It’s staying up,” declared Ralph Johnson, city public works director, over the noisy traffic.

Prehistoric European Cave Artists Were Female

There are recent articles about this same topic on some of those newsy newsiosh websites. A little research shows it is not an new idea and that it has been kicking around since at least 2009.



hand-stencil-copy_big  infrared-handprints_big


Prehistoric European Cave Artists Were Female

nationalgeographic.com  |  Thursday, October 28, 2010

June 16, 2009–Inside France‘s 25,000-year-old Pech Merle cave, hand stencils surround the famed “Spotted Horses” mural.

For about as long as humans have created works of art, they’ve also left behind handprints. People began stenciling, painting, or chipping imprints of their hands onto rock walls at least 30,000 years ago.

Until recently, most scientists assumed these prehistoric handprints were male. But “even a superficial examination of published photos suggested to me that there were lots of female hands there,” Pennsylvania State University archaeologist Dean Snow said of European cave art.

By measuring and analyzing the Pech Merle hand stencils, Snow found that many were indeed female–including those pictured here. (Also see: pictures of hand stencils through time.)

—Photograph courtesy Dean Snow
Analyzing hand stencils dating back some 28,000 years in Spain‘s El Castillo cave, archaeologist Dean Snow concluded many of El Castillo’s artists had been female.”The very long ring finger on the left is a dead giveaway for male hands,” he said. “The one on the right has a long index finger and a short pinky–thus very feminine.”His findings suggest women’s role in prehistoric culture may have been greater than previously thought.

—Photographs by Roberto Ontanon Peredo, courtesy Dean Snow
Just as in prehistoric times, visitors today can leave behind handprints at Spain’s Maltravieso cave, a Paleolithic site dating back more than 20,000 years. “Elena’s hand [pictured] was typical for little girls,” said Snow.Hand proportions vary across populations. To assess prehistoric handprints from Europe, Snow used modern hands for comparison.”I had access to lots of people of European descent who were willing to let me scan their hands as reference data,” said Snow, whose research was supported by the National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration. (The National Geographic Society owns National Geographic News.)

—Photograph courtesy Dean Snow
In France’s Gargas cave, a late Paleolithic left-hand stencil glows green from a night vision camera. Archaeologist Dean Snow concluded the hand was female.”We don’t know what the roles of artists were in Upper Paleolithic society [roughly 40,000 to 20,000 years ago] generally,” he said. “But it’s a step forward to be able to say that a strong majority of them were women.”Snow’s research was limited to Europe, but he hopes others will do similar studies at prehistoric sites elsewhere.
—Photograph courtesy Dean Snow

Missing boy found safe playing inside toy claw machine


Another claw machine kid! I love these kids and apparently it is pretty common or at least it is in my weird world. For other claw or prize machine kids click here, and here and yes here.

giant claw machine kid

Missing boy found safe playing inside toy claw machine

Apr 15, 2014  |  Jenn Hatcher  |  klkntv.com

A 3-year-old Lincoln boy disappeared Monday night and where he was found is pretty amazing.

After his mother called 911, the toddler was located across the street from their apartment at Madsen’s Bowling Alley and Billiards, inside the businesses, get this, claw machine.

Continue reading »

‘Snotty’ new jellyfish discovered in Tasmania



Many newly discovered species are teeny tiny little things, not these jellyfish!


New species of giant ‘snotty’ jellyfish found in Tasmania

Megan Levy  |  Fe

A previously unidentified species of giant jellyfish is invading southern Tasmania this summer, baffling scientists after one of the animals washed up on the beach.

And watch out – the new species is described as being a type of “snotty”.

The Lim family were collecting shells on a beach in Howden, south of Hobart, last month when they stumbled across a monster 1.5-metre jellyfish on the shore.

So unusual was the gigantic blob that the family took a photograph, and forwarded it to the CSIRO.

“In Tasmania, we don’t do jellyfish. This was something else. We’ve just never seen anything like it,” said Josie Lim of their find.

Little did the Lim family know that, over at the CSIRO, Dr Lisa-ann Gershwin, who has been working with jellyfish for 20 years, had been hearing stories of this elusive animal in waters off Tasmania for more than a decade.

Continue reading »